They Get Questions


<a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1808&amp;entry_id=1625" title="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/23/AR2008012301113.html" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/23/AR2008012301113.html’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">The Wasington Post</a> gets a question from someone looking for a common succulent in the DC area.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">Q. I am trying to find an indoor succulent known as donkey or burro tail. This is a delicate plant that doesn’t hold up well to shipping. Do you know of any local source?<br />
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A. Burro tail ( Sedum morganianum) is a fairly common succulent that can often be found in garden center cacti and succulent sections. If your favorite garden center doesn’t have the plant in stock, the staff should be able to get one for you.<br />
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The fleshy leaves of this light-loving succulent are prone to break off, but shipping has improved in recent years and many mail order firms do such a good job of packing that plants withstand a lot of jostling with no injuries.<br />
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There is also a selection of this plant called Burrito that does not shatter in shipping.<br />
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It is available from Highland Succulents ( http://www.highlandsucculents.com). If you mail-order it, you will most likely get an unrooted cutting.<br />
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Burro tail is easy to root: Simply remove the leaves from the lower portion of the stem and stick it in cactus soil. Keep it just barely moist, and it will root in a few weeks. Rooting and growth will be best in spring, when more light is available; you can also grow the plant under a high-intensity discharge lamp. </span><br /></div><br />So that’s where it is – not in the area at all. You know, we carry it and can ship it too (and they would be rooted!) <br /><br />You know, these are strange question to be asking one of the premier national political newspapers in the middle of a campaign season. I think a better and more timely question would have been where to find nopales on the menu of a fancy mexican restaurant in DC. Because they’re delicious.<br /><br />


    
    
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