Prickly Pears


They’ve been eating them in the Americas for centuries. From Humboldt County’s <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1809&amp;entry_id=1628" title="http://www.northcoastjournal.com/012408/food0124.html" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.northcoastjournal.com/012408/food0124.html’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">North Coast Journal </a>comes this long article about the eating habits of native americans.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">Throughout North America, prior to the westward press of pioneers, native people exploited their environment ingeniously….<br />
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The Plains Indians, whose staple protein was bison, ate a starchy lily root called camas, from which they made bread, as well as tubers with flavors resembling sweet potato and salsify….<br />
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Even in the arid Southwest, mesquite beans, pine nuts, <span style="font-weight: bold;">nopales (from prickly pear cactus)</span> and banana yucca supplemented The Three Sisters, together with a wide variety of chiles.</span><br /></div><br />And good for you too.<br /><br />


    
    
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